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Archive for the ‘Medicine’ Category

They’ve done it again, kiddie-winkers.

While we were out planning our gardens and trying to figure out how to hurt ourselves with fireworks, the devoted geeks and nerdlings in the world of science have come up with these findings!

 

18-05-14

 

Dinosaur: http://bit.ly/1lxLRTu
Gluten: http://bit.ly/1gT4Wgc
Prehistoric girl: http://bit.ly/1j45bcI
Glaciers: http://bit.ly/1on1lP6
Lucid dreaming: http://bit.ly/1glhORI
Exoplanet: http://bit.ly/1iYOxel
Sperm: http://bit.ly/1mYRPhh
Measles: http://bit.ly/S7b5jd

Well done, folks. Very well done indeed.

The world owes you a huge debt of gratitude!

aa-kendo-kanji-red

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Well, the geeks and nerdlings out in science land have done it again.

While we were out doing… like… whatever… they were doing this!

04-04-14

 

DNA: http://bit.ly/1mfICVP
Sperm: http://bit.ly/1obvldN
Muscles: http://bit.ly/1iHZthN
Exoplanet: http://bit.ly/1mejhqV
Star cluster: http://bit.ly/1jlhbq0
Circuit board: http://bit.ly/S6XlW7
Element: http://bit.ly/1nQqH7K
Heart transplants: http://bit.ly/1u4ST8t

Well done, people. Very well done.

We owe you so much. Thank you for making the world a better place and enriching our lives!

aa-kendo-kanji-red_____________________________________________________________

Thanks, as always, to the wonderful people over at IFLS!

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This Week in Science (January 24, 2014)

Yes, boys and girls, geeks and nerdlings… scientists the world over have come up with some pretty neato stuff this week!

jan-26-2014

Excellent stuff, for sure!

Read more at the links below!

Black holes: http://bit.ly/M1dPva
Mantis shrimps: http://bit.ly/1n2GT3N
Cancer genome: http://bit.ly/1ggGtGv
Dolphin: http://bit.ly/1e7ZB6l
Cosmic web: http://bit.ly/M1eeh9
Supernova: http://bit.ly/M1e610
Shark extinction: http://bit.ly/1cj0TLp
Ceres: http://bit.ly/1fghjF4

aa-kendo-kanji-red_________________________________________________

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Website: http://www.iflscience.com/

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While the rest of us were off doing whatever the rest of us do…

Science geeks and nerdlings the world over have been discovering things that make the world an even more awesome place!

sept-in-science

Cancer: http://bit.ly/167lkrE
Whispering: http://bit.ly/1biP5Ke
New form of matter: http://bit.ly/18CYkz3
Climate change: http://bbc.in/19P6vax
Mars: http://bit.ly/1bkPA6A
Oxygen: http://bit.ly/1bUtZkO
Jaw & backbone: http://bit.ly/15Dv3HJ
Solar panels: http://bit.ly/167lCyT

aa-kendo-kanji-red

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This Week In Science

june-16-2013

Please bear in mind that these are all simply headlines. Please READ the articles linked above before commenting on any of these stories, as a one sentence summary does not present all the facts.

Gene therapy: http://bit.ly/ZSA7mF
Multiple Sclerosis: http://bit.ly/106VoLK
New layer of the cornea: http://bit.ly/16wlVl5
Bioengineered vein: http://bit.ly/16YgOO9
Dark matter: http://bit.ly/1a1S9Hh
Gene patents: http://bit.ly/196Q6QJ

aa-kendo-kanji-red

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Torn from today’s headlines!!

Self-Medication in Animals Much More Widespread Than Believed

YES!! Drug use in the animal kingdom is a much more pervasive activity than originally suspected!

As our intrepid geeks and nerdlings over at ScienceDaily.com reveal, “It’s been known for decades that animals such as chimpanzees seek out medicinal herbs to treat their diseases. But in recent years, the list of animal pharmacists has grown much longer, and it now appears that the practice of animal self-medication is a lot more widespread than previously thought, according to a University of Michigan ecologist and his colleagues.”

The fact that moths, ants and fruit flies are now known to self-medicate has profound implications for the ecology and evolution of animal hosts and their parasites, according to Mark Hunter, a professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and at the School of Natural Resources and Environment.

monarch-eggs(A parasite-infected monarch butterfly lays her eggs on medicinal tropical milkweed that will help to protect her offspring from disease.) [1]

In addition, because plants remain the most promising source of future pharmaceuticals, studies of animal medication may lead the way in discovering new drugs to relieve human suffering, Hunter and two colleagues wrote in a review article titled “Self-Medication in Animals,” to be published online today in the journal Science.

“When we watch animals foraging for food in nature, we now have to ask, are they visiting the grocery store or are they visiting the pharmacy?” Hunter said. “We can learn a lot about how to treat parasites and disease by watching other animals.”

Much of the work in this field has focused on cases in which animals, such as baboons and woolly bear caterpillars, medicate themselves. One recent study has suggested that house sparrows and finches add high-nicotine cigarette butts to their nests to reduce mite infestations.

“Perhaps the biggest surprise for us was that animals like fruit flies and butterflies can choose food for their offspring that minimizes the impacts of disease in the next generation,” Hunter said. “There are strong parallels with the emerging field of epigenetics in humans, where we now understand that dietary choices made by parents influence the long-term health of their children.”

fruitfly-larva(Fruitfly larva – Is this young’un getting the benefits of Mom’s drug use?)

The authors [2] argue that animal medication has several major consequences on the ecology and evolution of host-parasite interactions.

In addition, animal medication should affect the evolution of animal immune systems, according to Hunter and his colleagues.

The authors also note that the study of animal medication will have direct relevance for human food production.

aa-kendo-kanji-red___________________________________________________________

[1] Image credit Jaap de Roode

[2] The first author of the science paper is Jacobus de Roode of Emory University. The other author is Thierry Lefevre of the Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement in France.

Journal Reference: J. C. de Roode, T. Lefevre, M. D. Hunter. Self-Medication in AnimalsScience, 2013; 340 (6129): 150 DOI:10.1126/science.1235824

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