Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

Sorry I’ve not been around as regularly as I usually am. I just finished editing my first novel, and am a month away from finishing and editing my second novel,  volumes one and two in “The Great Dead North” series. Hopefully, they’ll be published soon and will be available as e-books and publish on demand (for those who love paperbacks). I thought I’d post a photo of this little guy from Australia… leadbeaters-possum A Leadbeater’s Possum (aka Fairy Possum). Too cute for words. A friend of mine told me, “ In Arkansas, this thing would be in a stew so fast, it’d make yer head spin!” I miss The South. aa-battle-flag-1s I’ll be back, inflicting my random scribblings on an unsuspecting public as soon as I can. aa-kendo-kanji-red

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Saw this photo at TheFeaturedCreature.com and had to share!

clown-spider-2(Photo Credit: Igor Ryabov)

This ‘scary clown’ spider is actually a species of crab spider in the family Thomisidae. Ukrainian photographer Igor Ryabov, 44, a full time engineer, has been experimenting with macro photography for the past three years and spotted the crab spider near to his house.

Tell me this thing doesn’t remind you of Pennywise the Clown from Stephen King’s “It!”

aa-kendo-kanji-red

Read Full Post »

Science Bulletins: Biodiversity Unveiled—New Animal Discoveries

Last year was a big year when it came to the discovery of new animal species. From legless lizards to purring monkeys, scientists described over 18,000 unique animal species in 2013.

Watch the video (above) to learn more about the animal discoveries of 2013.

Tree frog(Tree frog – Image: Trond Larsen)

Over 1.6 million species of animal life are currently known, but global biodiversity is estimated to be much greater. Some scientists believe the total could be as high as ten million unique species, meaning this year will probably bring plenty of new breathtaking discoveries.

aa-kendo-kanji-red__________________________________________________

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy, Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the American Museum of Natural History.

Text: by Katherine A. Thichava at The Rainforest Site.

Read Full Post »

The knight and his steed.

froggy-back(© Nicolas Reusens)

A tropical capture in Costa Rica.

aa-kendo-kanji-red__________________________________________________

The 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

Read Full Post »

Should We Bring Extinct Animals Back to Life?

Wouldn’t it be cool (or would it?) if we could bring wooly mammoths back and have them live in Greenland, Siberia or the Canadian tundra?

mammoth

Even a single herd of wooly rhinos roaming around in some secluded part of the world?

woolly_rhinoceros

With cloning, we probably could. But should we?

When I saw these photos… when I asked myself this question… I was immediately reminded of the famous scene in Steven Spielberg’s 1993 movie, Jurassic Park

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Gee, the lack of humility before nature that’s being displayed here, uh… staggers me.

Donald Gennaro: Well thank you, Dr. Malcolm, but I think things are a little bit different than you and I had feared…

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, I know. They’re a lot worse.

Donald Gennaro: Now, wait a second now, we haven’t even seen the park…

John Hammond: No, no, Donald, Donald, Donald… let him talk. There’s no reason… I want to hear every viewpoint, I really do.

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Don’t you see the danger, John, inherent in what you’re doing here? Genetic power is the most awesome force the planet’s ever seen, but you wield it like a kid that’s found his dad’s gun.

Donald Gennaro: It’s hardly appropriate to start hurling generalizations…

Dr. Ian Malcolm: If I may… Um, I’ll tell you the problem with the scientific power that you’re using here, it didn’t require any discipline to attain it. You read what others had done and you took the next step. You didn’t earn the knowledge for yourselves, so you don’t take any responsibility for it. You stood on the shoulders of geniuses to accomplish something as fast as you could, and before you even knew what you had, you patented it, and packaged it, and slapped it on a plastic lunchbox, and now

[bangs on the table]

Dr. Ian Malcolm: you’re selling it, you wanna sell it. Well…

John Hammond: I don’t think you’re giving us our due credit. Our scientists have done things which nobody’s ever done before…

Dr. Ian Malcolm: Yeah, yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.

John Hammond: Condors. Condors are on the verge of extinction…

Dr. Ian Malcolm: [shaking his head] No…

John Hammond: If I was to create a flock of condors on this island, you wouldn’t have anything to say.

Dr. Ian Malcolm: No, hold on. This isn’t some species that was obliterated by deforestation, or the building of a dam. Dinosaurs had their shot, and nature selected them for extinction.

John Hammond: I simply don’t understand this Luddite attitude, especially from a scientist. I mean, how can we stand in the light of discovery, and not act?

Dr. Ian Malcolm: What’s so great about discovery? It’s a violent, penetrative act that scars what it explores. What you call discovery, I call the rape of the natural world.

Dr. Ellie Sattler: Well, the question is, how can you know anything about an extinct ecosystem? And therefore, how could you ever assume that you can control it? I mean, you have plants in this building that are poisonous, you picked them because they look good, but these are aggressive living things that have no idea what century they’re in, and they’ll defend themselves, violently if necessary.

John Hammond: Dr. Grant, if there’s one person here who could appreciate what I’m trying to do…

Dr. Alan Grant: The world has just changed so radically, and we’re all running to catch up. I don’t want to jump to any conclusions, but look… Dinosaurs and man, two species separated by 65 million years of evolution have just been suddenly thrown back into the mix together. How can we possibly have the slightest idea what to expect?

John Hammond: [laughing] I don’t believe it. I don’t believe it! You’re meant to come down here and defend me against these characters, and the only one I’ve got on my side is the blood-sucking lawyer!

Donald Gennaro: Thank you.

aa-kendo-kanji-red

Read Full Post »

Thanks to intrepid science reporter Danielle Elliot!

As she reports in the Weird & Wild section at the National Geographic, an influx of emus is starting to take over a town in Queensland, Australia.

Shopkeepers in any downtown area love foot traffic, right? It’s the key to business.

But what if that traffic isn’t full of potential shoppers. What if, instead, it’s a flock of large birds strutting their stuff down the sidewalks?

That’s the scene these days in Longreach, Queensland; an influx of emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae) is starting to take over the town.

“They were waltzing up and down the street, drinking from the puddles and having a nibble in the garden beds at a council redevelopment site down the road. They were making themselves right at home,” gallery and coffee shop owner Deb Scott told The Australian.

Local experts say the emus are looking for food, but drivers are more concerned that they’re going to end up as road kill—someone forgot to teach them to look both ways before crossing the street.

“They are taking absolutely no notice of the people, or the cars or dogs,” Longreach Mayor Joe Owens told the Australian Broadcasting Company. “When they are crossing the street, people have to stop for them. They just toddle across as they please.”

And that’s posing a challenge for drivers, considering their long legs allow them to sprint at 31 miles per hour and cover up to nine feet in a single stride. The largest bird native to Australia, they have soft brown feathers, but they never take flight. (Related: “The Great Emu Caper.”)

emus-take-over-town

The emus have been circling the outlying areas of town for a few months, the ABC reports, but this is the first time they’ve ventured into the more densely populated town center.

Under normal conditions, emus stick to the brush, feasting on seeds, grass, and insects. They can last several weeks without a meal, but higher-than-average temperatures and an extended drought have left them on the hunt.

“The [kangaroos] and the emus are just desperately seeking something to eat and a bit of greenery, so they are marching in and getting it wherever they can,” naturalist Angus Emmott told ABC.

As the drought continues, there’s no telling when the emus will leave the main areas of town, but one thing’s for sure: It’s not every day that you get to share a sidewalk with an emu.

aa-kendo-kanji-red__________________________________________________

Danielle Elliot is a multimedia producer and writer who earned her chops reporting and producing for networks, start-ups, and everything in between. A graduate of the University of Maryland, she covered tennis and Olympic figure skating for a few years before earning an M.A. in Science and Health Journalism at Columbia University.

Follow her on Twitter.

Read Full Post »

While the rest of us were off doing whatever the rest of us do…

Science geeks and nerdlings the world over have been discovering things that make the world an even more awesome place!

sept-in-science

Cancer: http://bit.ly/167lkrE
Whispering: http://bit.ly/1biP5Ke
New form of matter: http://bit.ly/18CYkz3
Climate change: http://bbc.in/19P6vax
Mars: http://bit.ly/1bkPA6A
Oxygen: http://bit.ly/1bUtZkO
Jaw & backbone: http://bit.ly/15Dv3HJ
Solar panels: http://bit.ly/167lCyT

aa-kendo-kanji-red

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »